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    Hope Goldie 1948, courtesy of Beth Walpole.
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    Hope Goldie and Cyril Price with new Fordson van 'Simitra' 1950, courtesy of Ferguson Memorial Library, Sydney.
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Goldie, Hope (1896 - 1964)

Born
1896
Morpeth, New South Wales, Australia
Died
1964
South Yarra, Victoria, Australia
Occupation
Missionary
Alternative Names
  • Goldie, Annie Hope

Summary

Hope Goldie was a missionary with the Australian Presbyterian Mission in Sholinghur, South India for thirty years from 1927 to 1957.

Details

Hope Goldie was the third child of James and Isabella Goldie. She was born in New South Wales but later returned and was raised in her parents home town of Port Fairy in south-western Victoria.

She had a short-lived career in teaching before completing a course as a deaconess at the Deaconess and Missionary Training Institute in Carlton. Late in 1927 she went to India as part of the Australian Presbyterian Mission in Sholinghur South India.

Hope learned to speak and write the Tamil language, overcame and adapted to the climate and the poor living conditions and devoted the next thirty years to living the message of the Christian gospels. After being involved in a great variety of mission work - health, education, evangelism and work with women - she moved from the mission compound to her own bungalow in a weaver's village called Ramakrishnarajupet.

There she opened her Santhi Nilayam (Abode of Peace), a refuge for people in need and a centre of expansion work into the villages where welfare and handcraft centres were established. Her (secret) gift of £1000 was used to purchase a Fordson van to use as an ambulance and a roadside clinic. Hope's Indian co-workers included a doctor, nurses and evangelists.

The building of a village church was a significant achievement for Hope. With money given by an Australian congregation she was able to purchase land and oversee the building of a church in an Indian architectural style. On completion the Poddaturpeta church was absorbed into the Church of South India and dedicated by the Bishop of Madras on 29 June 1952.

In 1957, after thirty years in India, Hope Goldie retired and returned to live in Melbourne. She continued to promote the work in India at every opportunity and contributed most of what small savings she had to projects such as village wells. She died in 1964. There were many tributes from the Australian and Indian churches.

Sources used to compile this entry: Morkham, Marjorie, A. Hope Goldie 1896-1964: a very suitable name for a missionary, Marjorie Morkham, Apollo Bay, 2012; Ritchie, Catherine I., Not to be ministered unto: The story of Presbyterian deaconesses trained in Melbourne, Diaconate Association of Victoria, Collingwood, 1998.

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Digital resources

Title
Extended bibliography relating to the life of Annie Hope Goldie
Type
Document

Details

Title
Extended biographical essay on the life og Annie Hope Goldie
Type
Document
Date
1896 - 1964

Details

Title
Hope Goldie 1948
Type
Image
Date
1948
Source
Beth Walpole

Details

Title
Hope Goldie and Cyril Price with new Fordson van 'Simitra' 1950
Type
Image
Date
1950
Source
Ferguson Memorial Library, Sydney

Details

Marjorie Morkham

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